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Thread: North Carolina huge spider!

  1. #1

    North Carolina huge spider!

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    Has anyone seen a spider like this one, it's abdomen was about 1 and 1/2 inch long. huge!@

  2. #2
    Community Guide Eric's Avatar
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    Hi, Christie:

    Yes, this is a female wolf spider of some kind, family Lycosidae. Wolf spiders are pretty difficult to identify beyond the family level, but Mandy may recognize it more specifically.

    Eric

  3. #3

    North Carolina huge spider

    Thanks Eric,

    I've been so excited to find out about this spider since I saw it. After researching it myself, I had a suspicion that is was a wolf spider (lycosidae), but the fact that most I saw on the internet had hair made me still wonder. This one being so big just made a HUGE impression on me. I love spiders and since seeing this one, I havene learned so much about them, especially from this great site. I did read something about a species known as Carolineaus Hogne, and am feeling that species. I'm happy to find out what family she belongs to , and I am looking forward to hearing from Mandy. Oh by the way how can you tell that she is a female

    Thanks again, Christie

  4. #4
    Community Guide Eric's Avatar
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    You're welcome, Christie! The species you refer to is actually Hogna carolinensis. Yes, that could be it.

    Eric

  5. #5
    Administrator Mandy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by christie View Post
    Oh by the way how can you tell that she is a female?
    Her large abdomen and skinny pedipalps peg her as a female. Males have pedipalps that are large/swollen on the tips and they have smaller abdomens and usually longer legs. Also, with Hogna, the body coloration and patterning is usually pretty different for each gender.

    I do think she is a member of the genus Hogna, but not sure which exact species she is without an exam under a microscope. (This one does have hair, it's just short and hard to see unless you're really close up. The reason for the nickname "wolf spider" is actually because of the way the spiders hunt, rather than how much hair they have. It's a tough family, like Eric said... there's at least 250 individual species of wolf spider in North America, so when you google them, you'll see quite the variety.)

    I'm glad you are spider-friendly and willing/wanting to learn about them!

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