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Thread: brown spider found, CT (possibly hobo?)

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    brown spider found, CT (possibly hobo?)

    So I found this not-so-little guy running across my basement...he was extrmely fast! This is the 3rd or 4th one ive caught. I live in CT but soon before I started finding them, we had a delivery of washer parts that came from NY but the boxes were shipped from washingto (I think) before they came from NY to us. I dont have the address labels anymore. Found the first one in fall and this guy I found this spring. Ive been flyshing them because I dont know what they are but ive heen told by an exterminator that I know that it is a hobo so until I know for sure I will continue to flush. Now, so far the few that I found have had those huge 'boxer glove' things in the front, the size (including legs) is about a wuarter, maybe a bit larger. They have no hair, body is quite smooth. The picture makes it look brownish/black hut the actuall color is a bit more reddish/brown. Found them all on my basement floor, running. I havent found any webs out of the ordinary but I did find these mud-like egg cases. Theyre about the size of a penny and have 3 seperate holes and when I crumbled one, it had spider webbing inside, like a spider egg sac that has been rolled around in dirt. would love any info on what these guys are!
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    And can someone confirm they can see the pics? Im using my to and I just want to make sure it worked
    Last edited by kim79; 06-23-2012 at 11:01 AM.

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    Distinguished Member MyssArachnomancer's Avatar
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    Though I cannot ID the species, I can tell you this is not the Hobo Spider (Tegenaria agrestis). Hobo Spiders occur only in the Northwest Rockies. They have never been proven to be more dangerous than any other 'common' spider. It's all urban myth.

    This may be a male Amaurobid, or Hacklemesh Weaver. Males of any spider species may wander far and wide looking for mates. I can tell you that whatever the species is, it's not dangerously venomous. Just looking for some love.

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    Thank you! I have been feeling bad for flushing them until I found out for sure what they were...any idea what those egg casings may be? They were stuck to the inside of the basement window...about 4/5 clusters...unfinished cement basement and there were some spiderwebs in the window as well...thanks for the help!

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    Junior Member Yogidbear8's Avatar
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    The "egg casings" look like they may belong to a potters wasp. Somewhat similar to the other mud building wasps but smaller. I could be wrong though. The eggs themselves form a silken case as they grow and expand, though this is only observation and i haven't done a lot of research into these.

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    Though I am not one of the experts here, I concur that this is definitely NOT a hobo spider. It looks to me more like one of the wolf spiders, family Lycosidae, though I can't see the eye arrangement enough to tell for sure. The size, coloring, stripes and shape of the cephalothorax are right for a Wolf Spider, though some of the funnel weavers can look similar. You can compare your spider with others posted here by going to this link: http://www.spiders.us/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=25 and reading the various threads.

    The mud nests look also to me like the product of some kind of wasp. A number of wasps sting spiders to paralyze them and then place them in mud nests after laying one or more eggs on the paralyzed carcass. The "silk" in the egg casings could be spider related or a byproduct of a pupa that matured in the casing.

    acbaker

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    Moderator Ungoliant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kim79 View Post
    ive heen told by an exterminator that I know that it is a hobo so until I know for sure I will continue to flush. Now, so far the few that I found have had those huge 'boxer glove' things in the front
    I don't have too much to add that hasn't already been said, but I just wanted to mention that the "boxer gloves" are not a reliable way to identify hobo spiders. All sexually mature male spiders have enlarged/bulbous pedipalps. (Females also have pedipalps, but they lack the bulbs at the end.) This may be more than you want to know, but this bulbous structure is used to transfer sperm to the female.

    Your story is a very good demonstration of how exterminators aren't necessarily more knowledgeable about spiders than the average person. (Many are just in the business of trying to sell pesticides/treatments.)

    Quote Originally Posted by kim79 View Post
    I havent found any webs out of the ordinary but I did find these mud-like egg cases. Theyre about the size of a penny and have 3 seperate holes and when I crumbled one, it had spider webbing inside, like a spider egg sac that has been rolled around in dirt.
    I'm not an expert, and I don't know as much about insects as spiders, but the structure in your third photo does not look like it was made by a spider. As Yogidbear8 and acbaker mentioned, it looks more like something that would be made by a wasp.

    Some spiders don't use webs to catch prey. Moreover males (even those normally confined to webs) will wander in search of mates. Mating season varies by species, but it is common to find males on the prowl in spring and fall. If you are noticing a sudden influx of spiders in your home, this is the most likely explanation. This is a temporary phenomenon. You can relocate them if you don't want them in your home.
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    "There is no shame in not knowing. The problem arises when irrational thought and attendant behavior fill the vacuum left by ignorance." --Neil deGrasse Tyson

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